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twitter.com/Iona_Watson:

    Herbal Medicine (preventative)

    I love my little vitamin, mineral, supplement and herbal regime. I keep them in a giant 7-day pill box from the dollar store. I pulled it out of my purse last week in front of my SIL and she burst out laughing at me and called me an old lady.

    image

    And just for the fun of it, I would like to brag about my bargain hunting skillz. I was supposed to pay $50 for my herbal meds and I got it down to $29 including shipping. Thank you, thank you. Here’s my regimen:

    For my tummy:

    • ginger
    • probiotic

    image

    For my brain

    • gingko bilobo
    • flax seed

    For my joints image

    • turmeric

    For energy

    • ginseng
    • green tea
    • B-complex

    For Bladder Health

    • cranberry

    The cran is also good during cold season because of the the vitamin C. When it comes to the thing I find the most noticeable: there’s a HUGE difference when I take a good probiotic. My energy level is way up, too! I hope there aren’t long term side effects to taking probiotics regularly because it’s really the thing that changes me from lethargic and hazy, with terrible tummy pain to energetic and *healthy* feeling. I can feel it working too. The little villi (villlum) are doing their happy dance…

    I just now purchased Apple Cider Vinegar Capsule, which are supposed to be a cure all. 

    image

    There’s debate on whether these are truly effective or more placebo effect but they certainly don’t hurt. And the giant glass of water I have in the AM to go with it certainly helps, too! :-)

    Do you take anything? Swear by any herbal medicine type thing?

    — 4 days ago with 1 note
    #preventative medicine  #Herbal Medicine  #herbal supplements 

    5 years on and it’s still quite stuck in my craw, how nasty my thesis advisor was to me. It’s creative writing school. Since it’s school, it means there’s still something to learn. (Even after there’s quite a lot to learn, of course, but you see my point.) So, what I share in its infant stages—vague sketches and loose outlines of ideas—that should be molded, helped to sculpt, coaxed into its better form. It should not be derided, dismissed, and ridiculed for not being perfectly polished. Risk, colossal failure, exploration; these should be the watch words in the beginning stages of a manuscript/book/thesis, from which to learn, grow and nourish what’s possible. I shared my ideas, my notions, my unpolished possibilities and what I got back was condescending criticism that made me feel like I had no right to be a writer. I still have victim’s guilt: I should have known better; I should have been stronger; I should have said no. These are the feelings of the abused when thinking about the abuser. And I have no stronger more succinct manner of explaining what I endured than to use the term academic abuse. 

    But I am a strong person. Like all recovering victims, I’m working through my trauma. I’m using the experience to be the pillar upon which I rebuild a better, stronger me. I will use my experience to advocate for a better one for future students like me. I will be a much better educator because I know what a good, empowering experience entails. I know what works and what doesn’t. And I can use that to help other aspiring writers find their talents and skills. And I can use the fact that I kept going, I struggled on, I persevered to propel me to the next big thing. 

    Just know this: if any teacher, any educator, any person makes you feel stupid, whether she’s a nursery school lady or a graduate thesis advisor, that’s not you. That’s them. They’ve got some issue they need to work out for themselves and unfortunately, you’re the mislaid target. Speak up. Say something. Most of the time, if they’re awful to you, it turns out they’re awful to a lot of other people and really either need to quit or fix themselves before they continue down their destructive path. Speak up to whomever you think you can trust. Say how you feel. Talk it out to someone. That sort of behavior should never come from a professional. 

    — 6 days ago
    #academic abuse  #teachers  #poor teaching skills  #victim empowerment 
    This meme is my favorite.

    This meme is my favorite.

    — 1 week ago
    #memes I dig 
    Everything and everyone is your teacher.

    Everything and everyone is your teacher.

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    #memes I dig 
    This sounds like what we learn in my sociology class.

    This sounds like what we learn in my sociology class.

    — 1 week ago
    #memes I dig 
    Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple & learn how to handle them and pretty son you have a dozen. ~John Steinbeck

    Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple & learn how to handle them and pretty son you have a dozen. ~John Steinbeck

    — 1 week ago
    believermag:


“IT WILL KILL YOU, AND IT NEVER KNEW YOUR NAME.”
An Interview with Karen Russell About Her Syllabus
This is part of a series of conversations with writers who teach, where we discuss how they develop an idea for a course, generate a syllabus, and conduct a class. See the full syllabus here.
Karen Russell is the author of the novel Swamplandia!, a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize. She is also the author of two short story collections, Vampires in the Lemon Grove and St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves, and a novella, Sleep Donation. Russell is the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur Fellowship, and she has taught at Columbia University, Bard College, and Bryn Mawr College.
—Stephanie Palumbo
I. THE SPOTS ON THE LITERARY TRAM TOUR 
SP: Where did you teach this class?
KR: At the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. I should tell you I’m a little bit self-conscious, because I’d never taught this class before and was afraid I had the reek of fraudulence upon me. 
SP: I think most teachers feel that way.
KR: Yeah… We’ve been duped, right? [Laughs] But actually, I had a class with Bill Savage at Northwestern, on female writers of the Beat Generation like Djuna Barnes—folks that I’d never read, and he hadn’t read them either. He was upfront about it: he would teach books he wanted to read, and we’d all be co-equals. I thought of him when I was teaching at Iowa, because I’d read and loved the books on my syllabus, but I’d never taught them before. 
SP: How did you choose the theme of landscape stories for your syllabus? 
KR: It’s interesting—some writers start with character, but I almost always start with place. If I don’t have a three-dimensional sense of the story’s setting—if I can’t see it in my mind’s eye—I can’t even attempt to make the story come to life. If you ask me about books I love, like Rule of the Bone by Russell Banks or Anna Karenina, it’s the setting, and the sense memory of moving through the landscape of the book, that stays with me far longer than names of characters or details of plot. So I was thinking, what makes a world immersive? What makes a place a character? I realized you could teach any book under that rubric—even something by Beckett, that’s asserting it’s nowhere, definitely has its own atmosphere—so I tried to limit myself to stories set in places you can visit on the map. But I also taught Pedro Páramo, which takes place in the Mexican underworld, and they don’t have Delta flights there. [Laughs] 

Read More

    believermag:

    “IT WILL KILL YOU, AND IT NEVER KNEW YOUR NAME.”

    An Interview with Karen Russell About Her Syllabus

    This is part of a series of conversations with writers who teach, where we discuss how they develop an idea for a course, generate a syllabus, and conduct a class. See the full syllabus here.

    Karen Russell is the author of the novel Swamplandia!, a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize. She is also the author of two short story collections, Vampires in the Lemon Grove and St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves, and a novella, Sleep Donation. Russell is the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur Fellowship, and she has taught at Columbia University, Bard College, and Bryn Mawr College.

    —Stephanie Palumbo

    I. THE SPOTS ON THE LITERARY TRAM TOUR 

    SP: Where did you teach this class?

    KR: At the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. I should tell you I’m a little bit self-conscious, because I’d never taught this class before and was afraid I had the reek of fraudulence upon me. 

    SP: I think most teachers feel that way.

    KR: Yeah… We’ve been duped, right? [Laughs] But actually, I had a class with Bill Savage at Northwestern, on female writers of the Beat Generation like Djuna Barnes—folks that I’d never read, and he hadn’t read them either. He was upfront about it: he would teach books he wanted to read, and we’d all be co-equals. I thought of him when I was teaching at Iowa, because I’d read and loved the books on my syllabus, but I’d never taught them before. 

    SP: How did you choose the theme of landscape stories for your syllabus? 

    KR: It’s interesting—some writers start with character, but I almost always start with place. If I don’t have a three-dimensional sense of the story’s setting—if I can’t see it in my mind’s eye—I can’t even attempt to make the story come to life. If you ask me about books I love, like Rule of the Bone by Russell Banks or Anna Karenina, it’s the setting, and the sense memory of moving through the landscape of the book, that stays with me far longer than names of characters or details of plot. So I was thinking, what makes a world immersive? What makes a place a character? I realized you could teach any book under that rubric—even something by Beckett, that’s asserting it’s nowhere, definitely has its own atmosphere—so I tried to limit myself to stories set in places you can visit on the map. But I also taught Pedro Páramo, which takes place in the Mexican underworld, and they don’t have Delta flights there. [Laughs

    Read More

    — 1 week ago with 96 notes
    upthewitchypunx:

dammskaii:

upthewitchypunx:

upthewitchypunx:

Do you know what I love about my craft/Craft room? That I can do things like this that combine crafts (old dried up paint I’ve had for years) and witchcraft (jars, witches love jars)
I saw this awesome post of a curse jar and thought I might just paint eyes in one for my own different purpose. I haven’t dedicated it yet so that’s why I’m showing it. I’ve had the acrylics for years from when I used to marble paper and most of them were dried up and I had to add a little water so some of the eyes are a bit runny and I only had a rather thick brush, but it will suit my purpose and I’m happy with it.

Reblogging to write about the fun ideas I’ve had for this. I’ve decided to call it a focus jar and re-dedicate it for each use. The idea is that you put what you want focused on in the jar. Here are some ideas:
You need to focus on school work, put something that represents school work.
Maybe you need to focus on cleaning your house, put something that represents your house.
Have a friend with an unknown illness? Put a representation of them in the bottle to help the doctors focus.
Have a pesky neighbor and you want your other neighbors to see and also find them pesky, put something in the jar.
need a job, put something that represents a job in there.
Got someone that won’t leave you alone, let them see how all eyes on them feels.
The list could go on and on. Once I figure out what I need I’ll light a corresponding candle on top and let it do it’s thing. You don’t even have to use a candle. You could just tie it with string or ribbon or set tarot card around it that represent your purpose.

Can I put myself in it so people will focus on me

That will work too! Look at me! Look at me! I’m cute and funny and interesting, take a chance! Or I’m awesome and deserve a raise or promotion! Or notice me riding my bike and don’t hit me you people who turn right at a light and always forget to look out for bikes in the bike lane.
You could also make a jar with all the eyes on the outside to hide things or make things not seen.

    upthewitchypunx:

    dammskaii:

    upthewitchypunx:

    upthewitchypunx:

    Do you know what I love about my craft/Craft room? That I can do things like this that combine crafts (old dried up paint I’ve had for years) and witchcraft (jars, witches love jars)

    I saw this awesome post of a curse jar and thought I might just paint eyes in one for my own different purpose. I haven’t dedicated it yet so that’s why I’m showing it. I’ve had the acrylics for years from when I used to marble paper and most of them were dried up and I had to add a little water so some of the eyes are a bit runny and I only had a rather thick brush, but it will suit my purpose and I’m happy with it.

    Reblogging to write about the fun ideas I’ve had for this. I’ve decided to call it a focus jar and re-dedicate it for each use. The idea is that you put what you want focused on in the jar. Here are some ideas:

    • You need to focus on school work, put something that represents school work.
    • Maybe you need to focus on cleaning your house, put something that represents your house.
    • Have a friend with an unknown illness? Put a representation of them in the bottle to help the doctors focus.
    • Have a pesky neighbor and you want your other neighbors to see and also find them pesky, put something in the jar.
    • need a job, put something that represents a job in there.
    • Got someone that won’t leave you alone, let them see how all eyes on them feels.

    The list could go on and on. Once I figure out what I need I’ll light a corresponding candle on top and let it do it’s thing. You don’t even have to use a candle. You could just tie it with string or ribbon or set tarot card around it that represent your purpose.

    Can I put myself in it so people will focus on me

    That will work too! Look at me! Look at me! I’m cute and funny and interesting, take a chance! Or I’m awesome and deserve a raise or promotion! Or notice me riding my bike and don’t hit me you people who turn right at a light and always forget to look out for bikes in the bike lane.

    You could also make a jar with all the eyes on the outside to hide things or make things not seen.

    — 1 week ago with 283 notes
    Two Teens Who Were Sex Workers Were Murdered—Will America Pay Attention? | Bitch Media →

    Two teenage female sex workers of color, and two other women of color, all murdered in Jacksonville, FL in the past months. Where is the outcry???

    — 1 week ago with 7 notes
    #african american  #feminism  #murders  #murdered sex workers  #florida  #serial killer in Jacksonville